Final: AUTISM V VACCINES

autism_vaccine_syringe
I decided to fact check an article titled ” Vaccines & Autism” from the website sciencebasedmedicine.org. This article discusses whether or not vaccines cause autism. This is a topic that I can relate to because I am hoping to become a special education teacher one day and I am also a caretaker to my cousin, who suffers from severe special needs. My Aunt had seen this article on Facebook, posted by a group called Down syndrome/Autism/Vaccine Injury. My first step in my fact checking journey was to figure out what this group was about. This group doesn’t have a website, only a page on Facebook, where a community of disabled individuals and their caretakers help one another by posting information and resources for these individuals. The page was created by Holly Martin Giglio, who has a daughter that suffers from down syndrome. She created a closed group on Facebook in order to provide support for parents who have a child born with Down syndrome and later regressed into autism through vaccine injury. She sent the article to me not too long ago and I thought it would be a great article to fact check because the topic is so controversial. Do you believe vaccines can cause autism? Let’s take a look at some studies…

downs:autism
Deciding whether or not your child should become vaccinated is a big deal, especially around flu season and when enrolling them into school. There have been many studies done that support both sides of this argument. What I liked about this article is that it listed several different outside posts about this topic. They’re wasn’t just one filter bubbleso that told me this article wasn’t going to be leaning pro or con vaccines. I went upstream by taking the article post on Facebook, linking it to the closed group Down syndrome/Autism/Vaccine Injury, and getting a better understanding about the admin Holly Martin Giglio. The post and the group is what led me to on Science-based medicine (SBM) page and that’s where I made myself familiar with the editors and contributors. This article is based off of six studies done by six different scientist/doctors who specialize in this field. Tome, scientific fact makes this article lean all the way to the right on our truthometer gage.

filter-bubbles-43pixels

While reading this article I was sure to keep chapter three of Caulfield’s WEB LITERACY FOR STUDENT FACT-CHECKERS book in mind. In that chapter, he discusses keeping your emotions in check and not completely writing off a piece of work or taking to heart what someone posts on social media sites. This is important to remember, especially when reading sensitive topics because it may lead the reader to react in an emotional way.

The article states that vaccines are generally considered to be the most successful public health intervention. And yet there have been people against the use of vaccines ever since vaccines were created. So-called antivaccinationists have claimed over the years that vaccines do not work, even though there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that proves they do. These groups often spread misinformation about vaccines, such as the notion that vaccines weaken the immune system, when in reality they work by strengthening the immune systems response against the target infection.

Another scientist named by Mrozek Budzyn showed that in a retrospective case-control study conducted in Poland, they found that there was no correlation between autism and either the single measles vaccine or the trivalent MMR vaccine. In fact, there appeared to be a protective effect in that there was less autism in those who were vaccinated. This is likely either a random result or the result of an unknown confounder. However, this study does not reflect any increased risk of autism in those receiving either type of vaccine.

vaccines-and-autism.thumb_-300x300
Being in the educational field, these groups cause major problems for administrators who mandate certain vaccines in order to enroll in school. These groups, most of the time, never perform any studies, but continue to post and share fake news.

This article conducted six different research cases from the six different scientists and doctors that proved getting vaccinated has no direct correlation with autism, measles, and or chrohns disease.

This population-based study investigated whether there was an association between the incidence of autism and MMR immunization in the North-East region. This study confirmed that there was an increase in the prevalence of autism but this increase was not related to the introduction of MMR or to vaccine coverage. This study did not identify any association between MMR vaccine and the age of diagnosis of autism. The results of this paper do not support a causal association between MMR and autism, either in its initiation or the onset of regression.

People will still unfortunately believe the fake news the antivaccinationists produce because parents, and rightfully so, hear this false information and fear that the vaccines will put their children in danger. If the last few weeks have taught me anything it is to never believe everything you read. In my opinion, the parents should read WEB LITERACY FOR STUDENT FACT-CHECKERS by Michael A. Caulfield, and factcheck the article before assuming that the information given is right. They should always take a step back and try to figure out where the source is coming from, learn about the people behind the articles, and what the content of their website is about. People would be surprised how many fake news articles come from well-known websites. Always check, never assume!

Vaccines and Autism DRAFT

autism_vaccine_syringe

I decided to fact check an article titled ” Vaccines & Autism” from the website sciencebasedmedicine.org. This article discusses whether or not vaccines cause autism. This is a topic that I can relate to because I am hoping to become a special education teacher one day and I am a caretaker to my cousin, who suffers from severe special needs. My Aunt had sent me this article not too long ago and I thought it would be a good article to fact check because the topic is so controversial. Do you believe vaccines can cause autism? Lets take a look at some studies…

Deciding whether or not your child should become vaccinated is a big deal, especially around flu season. There have been many studies done that support both sides of this argument. What I liked about this article was that it listed several different outside posts about this topic. They’re wasn’t just one filter bubble, so that told me this article wasn’t going to be leaning pro or con vaccines. I went upstream by clicking on Science-based medicine (SBM) page and made myself familiar with the editors an contributors.

vaccines-and-autism.thumb_-300x300

While reading this article I was sure to keep chapter 3 of Caulfield’s book in mind when he discusses keeping your emotions in check, which is important to remember especially when reading a sensitive topic.

Vaccines are generally considered to be the most successful public health intervention ever devised. And yet there have been opponents of vaccines ever since there have been vaccines. So-called antivaccinationists have claimed over the years that vaccines do not work, despite the overwhelming evidence that they do. They often spread misinformation about vaccine, such as the notion that vaccines weaken the immune system, when in fact they work by strengthening the immune response against the target infection.

Filter Bubbles

 

 

filter-bubbles
In the Ted Talk,  the author of “The Filter Bubble,” Eli Pariser, talks about filter bubbles and their effect on society. Filter Bubles are when a website selectively show information to a user  based on information about the user like location, past click-behavior and search history for example. Because the reader only sees things that relate to them or agree with their opinions and view points, users become separated from information that disagrees with them. These bubbles restrict us from receiving reliable and true information. You would be surprised at how many well know websites do this.

In a conservative bubble you would find websites like The Blaze, The Right Scoop, Lucianne, etc.

Liberal Websites would include CNN,Crooks and Liars,The Huffington Post,etc.

Mainstream Websites would include   NY TimesABC News,Wall Street Journal,etc.

 

filter-bubbles-43pixels

In these websites you would only see what their media wants you to see. You would get their half or version of the “full story” and give opinions based on their views, not all facts.

Filter Bubbles make it difficult because more than one bubbles can share a similar stories. Using The Blaze, Crooks and Liars, and the Wall street Journal they all share similar stories on Trump, The Las Vegas Shooting, and Gun Control. Each story having a different spin to cater to a one sided belief.

Luckily using our lateral readings we are able to figure out which side( right, left) the websites are going to be leaning, which can help us when trying to figure out the full truth of an article.

 

51XeDsyMa3L._SX325_BO1,204,203,200_

Fact Check#3 FoxNews,Reliable Source?

og-fn-foxnews

 

When finding sources for research papers, journals, and or just knowledgeable  information to make conversation with, you should always know how credible the information given is. If you’re having trouble with this check out Michael Arthur Caulfield’s online textbook titled “Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers,”  and read up on the“reading laterally” chapter, which allows the reader to see how credible the website is. When researching credibility, the first step is to look into the format of the website, author, and what people have to say about this particular website. Here is an example, using Foxnews.com.

About Fox News using Wikipedia:

Wikipedia says that “Fox News Channel has been accused of biased reporting, and promoting the Republican Party. Research shows that Fox News increases Republican vote shares among viewers. ”

 

Politifacts gave FoxNews an 100% rating for being half true, but nothing is to e said about any of the other categories.

fox news.png

Using Facebook you can see that close to 16 million people likes this page and are subscribed users, but the comments on each post range from every political view point.

facebook.png

Lets take a closer look using what we learned from Caulfield’s online textbook.

PROCCESS:

From doing research we can conclude that for the most part FoxNews has a right-wing bias.

EXPERTISE: The channel was created by Australian-American media mogul Rupert Murdoch, who hired former Republican Party media consultant and CNBC executive Roger Ailes as its founding CEO. Which leads us to eleven this website from the start was going to be more right-wing.

AIM:

Their Motto being ” Most viewed, Most trusted” Fox News is a news station whose aim is to give you breaking news on what is going on in todays world via TV, Phone, and Website.

CONCLUSION:

From doing our research we have found the FoxNews is a semi credible website, but mostly leans towards the right. This would make it difficult to use in an argument and paper because of its bias.

 

Fact Check #2 Justice for Pets

chaineddogs_19955813_8col

While scrolling through Facebook I came across a head line to an article that read “People Who Left Pets During Hurricane Irma Could Face Felony Charges”. This article goes into full detail about pet owners that panicked and either set their dogs free or chained them up to poles while escaping hurricane Irma. This article is extremely relevant to me because most of the animals that were rescued during hurricane Irma were sent to St. Huberts in Morristown, which is a shelter five minutes from my house. Being that it was found on Facebook I used my upstream skills learned in class to try and prove the authenticity of the information given. This article came from a website called Ladbible.com. Ladbible was started in 2012 and  is  a content–spanning editorial, video, and documentary website that is streamed from the UK. The website is meant to put  a smile on someone’s face with a funny video or by engaging their audience in social issues important to them. Their goal is to make a positive difference. Ladbible is apart of other groups and brands including: SPORTbible, Pretty52, branded content agency Joyride, and licensing arm CONTENTbible. This particular article was written by Stewart Perrie. Stewart, is a Trending Journalist at LADbible. There were a lot of mixed emotions on stewards article. Animal activists were outraged and others thought it was cruel to fine people who just lost everything. Before emotionally committing to this article, I decided to take the advice from our last reading and factcheck. As I continued to fact check this assignment, while still continuing to upstream, I saw that the New York Post interviewed one of the speakers in this article. Having this article be approved by the NY Post leads m
e to believe that this article is authentic.

Massive-Hurricane-Irma-Bears-Down-On-Florida_1.jpeg.CROP.promo-xlarge2

Fact Check #1 Is Man-made Climate Change a Hoax?

fact check 1.png

 

“30,000 scientists have come forward confirming that man-made climate change is a hoax perpetuated by the elite in order to make money,”

This was the headline from an article found on yournewswire.com. This is a website that broadcasts fake news mainly about science. 

While scrolling through my Facebook this was the headliner to an article on my facebook wall. It is a very controversial topic and the author did a good job of getting our attention, but like it says in page 5 of our book you can’t trust every post you see and emotionally react to them unless it is proven to be true. This was indeed  fake news and was proven not to be true. I checked this using Politicalfact.com, which was listed as a reliable source in our book. 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑